Not Better or Worse, Just Different

Why do we constantly feel the need to compare one thing to the next? That’s as dumb as trying to fit a triangle in a square hole, it doesn’t make sense.
My friends and family came to visit from the East Coast, and as they went back home it left me thinking; will we ever stop comparing locations and people to one another?
“When it rains in New York the city doesn’t shut down” or “Wow, I could never stand the huge rats of NYC, we don’t have that here” and even “The tap water tastes so crappy here, that’s why we’re lucky in New York.” Things are different, and there’s something to love about that.
On a more shallow note and for the sake of visual stimulation: you can sip an iced coffee to cool off during an LA winter, or drink a hot coffee to warm up during a NYC winter. There are various reasons to love both; #1 reason, coffee is amazing in all temperatures.
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And have we ever questioned the fact that we were raised to pick favorites? “What’s your favorite color?” “What’s your favorite number?” “What’s your favorite sports team?” Because people were so uncreative with asking meaningful questions when trying to get to know us that they forced us to pick favorites.
But hold up: what if there were no favorites, and things simply just were? Maybe we could actually start appreciating things for their authentic selves; people, locations, and beyond. What a #Mindbanger.

On the subject of people, it also dawned on me that there needs to be an attitude change in how we look at those around us. Human beings are complex creatures, we have good qualities, bad qualities, and weird qualities like consecutive sneezes late at night, (as I sneeze for the 8th time in a row). A girl who never missed a day of class in her life is no better than the guy who’s blatantly not helping a granny carrying groceries while crossing the street, they’re just two different people. Someone who speaks five languages is no better than someone who speaks one. Or let’s keep it real simple: the square is no better than the triangle, they’re just different.
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When it comes to traveling, having an “I like this more than…” or “this sucks compared to…” attitude will undoubtedly put a damper on your experience. Instead of appreciating what is, you’ll be bringing negative energy to things that aren’t, how backwards is that? You will literally be spending hours of your precious trip analyzing something that will never be, because newsflash: you’re in a different place, so things are different.
Deal with the differences and start thinking about it from a fresh perspective, not from a gloomy, almost baggage-filled opinion of places, or people. Leaving your comfort zone shouldn’t just mean getting on a plane and going somewhere new, it’s going somewhere new with a conscious effort of adopting a new perspective on things. Like, baby, goo-goo-ga-ga fresh; learn to walk and talk in the undiscovered city as if it were your first time.
When it’s all said and done, you’ll have a much more positive outlook with an endless amount of differences, (instead of negative comparisons) to talk about.

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